Frequently Asked Questions - Fit and Proper

What is 'fit and proper'?

Each applicant must satisfy a Registration Board that they are a fit and proper person to practise the profession.  To do this, they must provide information relating to their skills, knowledge, character and health.

 

What is self-declaration?

All those applying to register are asked to declare information about their skills, knowledge, character and health when seeking registration.

 

Does completing an approved educational programme show that someone is 'fit and proper'?

Completing an approved course/ programme of education and training does not guarantee that a person is ‘fit and proper’ or that they will become registered. 

It does show that an applicant meets the professional education and training standards and is eligible to apply for registration.

 

What information is required in relation to health?

When we talk about health we are not making judgements about whether someone is ‘healthy’ or in ‘good health’. The Board is also not making judgements about disabilities.

The Board is assessing if a health issue could affect an applicant’s ability to practise.

 

What information is required in relation to character?

The Board must consider whether an applicant is of ‘good character’ or whether there is any evidence of actions/ behaviour, current or past, which might suggest that the person is not suitable to engage in the practice of the profession.

The applicant is required to answer questions in relation to such issues as criminal and civil prosecutions, interactions with any professional, disciplinary or regulatory bodies or financial irregularities.

Each applicant is also required to undergo Vetting and/or provide a Certificate of Police Clearance (if they lived abroad over the age of 18 for a period of a year and a day) and to make a statutory declaration on the veracity of the character self-declaration.

 

Is there a list of health and character conditions which should be disclosed?

The Board must consider whether an applicant is of ‘good character’ or whether there is any evidence of actions/ behaviour, current or past, which might suggest that the person is not suitable to engage in the practice of the profession.

The applicant is required to answer questions in relation to such issues as criminal and civil prosecutions, interactions with any professional, disciplinary or regulatory bodies or financial irregularities.

Each applicant is also required to undergo Vetting and/or provide a Certificate of Police Clearance (if they lived abroad over the age of 18 for a period of a year and a day) and to make a statutory declaration on the veracity of the character self-declaration.

 

How will the Board make a decision about a health issue?

All information received about an applicant’s health is considered on a case by case basis and treated in the strictest of confidence.

Factors that will be considered include –

  • How the applicant currently manages their condition
  • Whether the applicant has shown insight and understanding of their condition and how it impacts on their work
  • Whether the applicant has made adjustments to their work with their employer

When a candidate declares that they have a health issue, the Registration Board decides, on a case by case basis, whether it will –

  • Accept the declaration and proceed to register the person, or

If the Registration Board requires more information it may, amongst other things

  • Ask the applicant to provide an up to date medical report, from their own medical profession, addressing whether the health issue interferes with their ability to engage in the practice of the profession, or
  • Request the applicant be seen by a medical professional, chosen by the Registration Board at the applicant's own expense, to give the Board a report as to whether the health issue affects their ability to engage in the practice of the profession